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Implementation of the PATH Statement

The recent PATH (Predictive Approaches to Treatment effect Heterogeneity) Statement outlines principles, criteria, and key considerations for applying predictive approaches to clinical trials to provide patient-centered evidence in support of decision making. Here challenges in implementing the PATH Statement are addressed with the GUSTO-I trial as a case study.

Implications of Interactions in Treatment Comparisons

This article explains how the generalizability of randomized trial findings depends primarily on whether and how patient characteristics modify (interact with) the treatment effect. For an observational study this will be related to overlap in the propensity to receive treatment.

The Burden of Demonstrating HTE

Reasons are given for why heterogeneity of treatment effect must be demonstrated, not assumed. An example is presented that shows that HTE must exceed a certain level before personalizing treatment results in better decisions than using the average treatment effect for everyone.

Assessing Heterogeneity of Treatment Effect, Estimating Patient-Specific Efficacy, and Studying Variation in Odds ratios, Risk Ratios, and Risk Differences

This article shows an example formally testing for heterogeneity of treatment effect in the GUSTO-I trial, shows how to use penalized estimation to obtain patient-specific efficacy, and studies variation across patients in three measures of treatment effect.

Viewpoints on Heterogeneity of Treatment Effect and Precision Medicine

This article provides my reflections after the PCORI/PACE Evidence and the Individual Patient meeting on 2018-05-31. The discussion includes a high-level view of heterogeneity of treatment effect in optimizing treatment for individual patients.

EHRs and RCTs: Outcome Prediction vs. Optimal Treatment Selection

Frank Harrell Professor of Biostatistics Vanderbilt University School of Medicine Laura Lazzeroni Professor of Psychiatry and, by courtesy, of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) and of Biomedical Data Science Stanford University School of Medicine

Statistical Errors in the Medical Literature

Misinterpretation of P-values and Main Study Results Dichotomania Problems With Change Scores Improper Subgrouping Serial Data and Response Trajectories Cluster Analysis As Doug Altman famously wrote in his Scandal of Poor Medical Research in BMJ in 1994, the quality of how statistical principles and analysis methods are applied in medical research is quite poor.